EMPATHY CAN NEVER BE ASSUMED.
— Film Crit Hulk, on why The Avengers version of the Hulk is a success where others have failed. (via oddernod)
Reblogged from

salesonfilm:

Stanley Kubrick directs A Clockwork Orange (1971)

iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesego’s Story

“Written by Katso Morapedi and directed by Botlhe Lesetedi Lesego’s Story is a short film about the struggles of a young girl in Gaborone, Botswana. The beautiful Palesa Sello stars in this gripping tale of tragedy, betrayal and love lost.” From and posted by: creative hub

More films from Botswana here.

Reblogged from Black Film
sarraounia:

Idrissa & Irina, scene from October by Abderrahmane Sissako

Set and shot in Moscow, October features a black African student, Idrissa, who is about to leave Russia, and his white Russian girlfriend Irina, who has recently become pregnant. The impending departure makes interaction complicated, and isolation and solitude increasingly overwhelming. Though centred on the couple, October’s non-linear plot – predicated on ellipsis, silence and the psyches of its characters – also calls to account Russian society for its indifference towards and rejection of interracial love. As October unfolds, Idrissa seems unwilling to continue with a traumatic relationship while Irina faces the dilemma of whether or not to get an abortion. Furthermore, Sissako uses the film’s circular plot to play skilfully with time (present, past and future). Thus, as October progresses, questions arising in the viewer’s mind include: does Idrissa know of Irina’s pregnancy? Have Idrissa and Irina managed to re-connect physically and mentally? Do they or will they manage to do so? Does Idrissa actually leave Russia? Is the whole film not a surreal experience? Rather than providing answers to such questions, October’s narrative cleverly emphasizes them.

By Dr Saer Maty Ba 

sarraounia:

Idrissa & Irina, scene from October by Abderrahmane Sissako

Set and shot in Moscow, October features a black African student, Idrissa, who is about to leave Russia, and his white Russian girlfriend Irina, who has recently become pregnant. The impending departure makes interaction complicated, and isolation and solitude increasingly overwhelming. Though centred on the couple, October’s non-linear plot – predicated on ellipsis, silence and the psyches of its characters – also calls to account Russian society for its indifference towards and rejection of interracial love. As October unfolds, Idrissa seems unwilling to continue with a traumatic relationship while Irina faces the dilemma of whether or not to get an abortion. Furthermore, Sissako uses the film’s circular plot to play skilfully with time (present, past and future). Thus, as October progresses, questions arising in the viewer’s mind include: does Idrissa know of Irina’s pregnancy? Have Idrissa and Irina managed to re-connect physically and mentally? Do they or will they manage to do so? Does Idrissa actually leave Russia? Is the whole film not a surreal experience? Rather than providing answers to such questions, October’s narrative cleverly emphasizes them.

By Dr Saer Maty Ba 

Reblogged from Black Film

iheartapple2:

Apple - iPhone 5 - TV Ad - Music Every Day

Reblogged from ParisLemon

b-sama:

Skin (starring Sophie Okonedo)

Based on a true story Skinlooks at the life of Sandra Laing who, according to the Skin movie website synopsis was the embodiment of a phenomenon I’m sure that most white South Africans at the time (and maybe even now) would like to deny existed: “…a black child born in the 1950s to white Afrikaners, unaware of their black ancestry. Her parents are rural shopkeepers serving the local black community, who lovingly bring her up as their ‘white’ little girl. But at the age of ten, Sandra is driven out of white society. The film follows Sandra’s thirty-year journey from rejection to acceptance, betrayal to reconciliation, as she struggles to define her place in a changing world - and triumphs against all odds.

Reblogged from Black Film

dynamicafrica:

Miracle Rising: South Africa

Earlier this year, the History Channel released ‘Miracle Rising’ - a documentary that looks at the painful transitional period in South Africa’s history, from a violently racially segregated nation to a country that, through the sociopolitical structures offered by democracy, established a crucial vehicle to obtaining peace and documenting important historical voids: The Truth and Reconciliation Committee.

Through personal accounts from South African and international figureheads, ‘Miracle Rising’ retraces the dismantling of the Apartheid regime in South Africa, and the unique and complex years that followed.

TW: violence, mentions of torture, skeletal remains, racism.

Reblogged from Black Film